Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Beverage - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Art - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Ghosts - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Martin - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Walnut Cove - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Fragmentation - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Greenway - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Art - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Amphitheatre - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Bear - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Art - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Cabin - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Shortia - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Kudzu - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Art - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016

Special Symposia

Conveners: Ginger Allington, University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Environment
Overview:

Land cover/land use change studies are predicated on reliable ontologies for vegetation classification and categorization. Classifications of land cover and land use, and land cover change have been useful for documenting forest loss, urbanization, and habitat conversion. However, the current global land cover data products are insufficient for arid grasslands for two reasons. First, current classification products have poor performance in arid systems and are extremely unreliable, particularly for distinguishing between cropland and grassland. Second, these classifications are discrete characterizations of dynamic systems and do not provide any information about grassland degradation, or relative condition; rather grassland is classified as a singular static state. Combined, these limitations mean that our ability to discern any information about change in grasslands with current mapping approaches is extremely limited. This symposium will bring together researchers engaged with remote sensing, land cover change detection, and spatial modeling of grasslands, and seeks to challenge the participants to re-imagine the process of mapping of grasslands on regional and global scales. The idea for this project comes from a need for a more useful and accurate portrayal of grassland dynamics in a spatial context. The goal is to spark new research that will create an entirely new system of characterizing and tracking grassland area and status that will be useful for arid systems research and land use/land cover change detection as well as monitoring and management of rangelands.

Conveners: Matt Betts, Oregon State University; Adam Hadley, University of Toronto, Oregon State University
Overview:

Global declines in pollinators and pollination are subjects of growing concern. Landscape-scale processes such as habitat loss and fragmentation are implicated as possible drivers in these declines. However, the complex nature of plant/pollinator/landscape interactions has presented additional challenges pertaining to choice of scale, definitions of connectivity, and confounded effects of landscape changes, requiring researchers to integrate concepts from previously disparate fields. We will invite global experts who work at the intersection of the fields of landscape ecology, pollination ecology, and behavioral ecology to present recent advances in pollination ecology in complex landscapes. In particular, this series of presentations will highlight efforts which: (1) examine pollinator behavior –particularly movement – as a potential mechanism for effects of landscape changes on pollination, (2) test the role of scale in structuring spatial pollination dynamics, (3) quantify habitat and matrix from plant and pollinator species’ perspectives, and (4) facilitate separating specific landscape processes driving pollination declines. 

Conveners: Samuel A. Cushman, U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station
Overview:

Entropy and the second law of thermodynamics are the central organizing principles of nature. Yet strangely, the ideas and implications of the second law are poorly developed in the landscape ecology literature. This is particularly strange given the focus of landscape ecology on understanding pattern-process relationships across scales in space and time. Every interaction between entities leads to irreversible change which increases the entropy and decreases the free energy of the closed system in which they reside. Descriptions of landscape patterns, processes of landscape change, propagation of pattern-process relationships across space and through time are all governed, constrained, and in large part directed by thermodynamics. This direct linkage to thermodynamics and entropy was noted in several of the pioneering works in the field of landscape ecology, yet in the subsequent decades our field has largely failed to embrace and utilize these relationships and constraints, with a few exceptions. The purpose of this symposium is to bring together scientists who are working on applications of thermodynamics in landscape ecology to consolidate current knowledge and identify key areas for future research. 

Overview:

Landscape design refers to a spatially explicit, collaborative plan for management of landscapes and supply chains. Landscape design can involve multiple scales and build on existing practices to reduce costs or enhance services. Appropriately applied to a specific context, landscape design can help people assess trade-offs when making choices about locations, types of feedstock, transport, refining and distribution of bioenergy products and services. The approach includes performance monitoring and reporting along the bioenergy supply chain. Examples of landscape design applied to bioenergy production systems are discussed. An impetus for coordination is critical, and incentives may be required to engage landowners and the private sector. A landscape design process may be stymied by insufficient data or participation. Hence devising and implementing landscape designs for more sustainable outcomes require clear communication of environmental, social, and economic opportunities and concerns. As society moves forward toward considering energy options other than petroleum-based fuels, bioenergy is an important alternative to evaluate.  Bioenergy refers to renewable energy made from materials derived from non-fossil, biological sources. That biomass may be any living or recently living organic material that has stored sunlight in the form of chemical energy, including plants, residues from agriculture or forestry, or the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes. Viable bioenergy systems should include feedstock options that are suitable in specific regions and contexts. There is no one feedstock type suitable for all places. The appropriate conditions for growing feedstocks in a region depend on prevailing climate and soils, past land-use practices, and existing equipment and experience of the growers. One approach to landscape design focuses on integrating bioenergy production with other components of environmental, social and economic systems. The use of woody biomass for energy from forestry operations in the Southeastern United States (SE US) has grown rapidly in recent years and is the focus of this symposium. Participants will discuss and evaluate conditions that foster progress toward bioenergy sustainability via a landscape design approach in the SE US.  

Conveners: Songlin Fei, Purdue University; Qinfeng Guo, U.S. Forest Service, Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center; Kevin Potter, North Carolina State University
Overview:

It is widely known that the invasion of exotic species can significantly alter the structure, function, and services of ecosystems. Considerable research has been conducted over the past two decades to understand the invasive process at small scales, often ignoring geographic heterogeneity. As a result, our ability to understand and forecast the spatial and temporal invasion dynamics is therefore limited especially at regional to continental scales. The objective of this proposed symposium is to promote the necessary interdisciplinary dialogue and to establish a regional network of ecologists, modelers, conservation biologists, and natural resource practitioners needed for better understanding of invasion patterns and processes. The symposium will have a cross-scale emphasis with the consideration of geographic heterogeneity driven by landscape changes, which is consistent with the meeting theme to capture the defining characteristic and the inherent nature of our modern world. The symposium will help to advance landscape ecology research in the area of invasive species and promote interdisciplinary research and communication among scientists, planners, and other professionals. 

S-6 Marine Landscape Ecology (CANCELLED)
Conveners:
Overview:

  

Conveners: Chunyang He, Beijing Normal University (China), State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Center for Human-Environment System Sustainability (CHESS); Jianguo Wu, Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences and Global Institute of Sustainability
Overview:

Drylands, characterized by low precipitation, high climatic variability, and infertile soils, cover about 41% of the world’s land area and are home to 35.5% of global population. Climate change and human activity pose a number of serious challenges to the ecology and sustainability of drylands in both developing and developed countries around the world.  Meeting these challenges requires knowledge from, and provides new opportunities for, landscape ecology. In particular, the emerging science of landscape sustainability – the capacity of a landscape to consistently provide long-term, landscape-specific ecosystem services essential for maintaining and improving human well-being – will be of critical importance for addressing sustainability questions in drylands and other landscapes worldwide. The goal of this symposium is to promote the theoretical development and practical applications of landscape sustainability science, with a focus on global drylands. Key topics include: (1)  Defining and quantifying landscape sustainability; (2) Interactions between ecosystem services and human wellbeing in dynamic landscapes; (3) Influences of climate change on landscape sustainability; and (4) Sustainable landscape design and planning. We will invite scientists who conduct research in different parts of the world to provide their perspectives and case studies about the state of science and practice of landscape sustainability of global drylands.

Conveners: Forrest M. Hoffman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Jitendra Kumar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Geoff Henebry, South Dakota State University
Overview:

Phenology, or the timing of recurrent life cycle events such as budburst, leaf out, and flowering in plants, and migration and reproduction in animals, is an integrative indicator of ecosystem health and function. Seasonality, or the timing of recurrent abiotic processes, such as soil freeze/thaw, mean stream discharge, and arrival of monsoon rains, is an ecosystem indicator that is complementary to phenology. In a way analogous to the diagnostic clues provided by blood pressure, persisting shifts or trends in typical patterns of phenological or seasonal timing can indicate and foretell important changes in ecosystem functions and services. Identification of appropriate baselines for phenologies and seasonalities is a key challenge in many ecosystems. When measured through remote sensing, suites of these indicators hold the promise of being used to monitor ecosystems and landscapes synoptically. This symposium will highlight the myriad ways that studies of phenology and seasonality have matured from their roots to encompass a range of broad applications, and will explore how monitoring, modeling and forecasting phenologies and seasonalities can advance the understanding of ecosystem functions and services throughout the next decade.

Conveners: Falk Huettmann, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, EWHALE Lab
Overview:

Machine Learning arguably presents the fore-front of quantitative analysis: from robust predictions to inference (Leo Breiman 2001). It includes many algorithms and statistical approaches to provide new knowledge, to mine data, and to study 'patterns & processes'. To many people, Machine Learning presents a paradigm shift on how to do science and on how to provide inference. This session will showcase and summarize the progress so far, and why Machine Learning methods, most of them non-parsimonious, are so powerful and so-well suited for Land- and Seascape Ecology applications, world-wide.

Conveners: Henriette Jager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Kristen Johnson, U.S. Department of Energy
Overview:

We convened an IALE Bioenergy-Biodiversity symposium in 2010 when bioenergy sustainability research was re-emerging after a long hiatus. Five years later, this follow-on symposium will convene landscape ecologists who have studied responses of birds, wildlife, pollinators, and aquatic biota to different bioenergy feedstocks and management practices during the intervening years. By shifting the economy away from fossil fuels, bioenergy is also shifting the ‘landscape’ of ecosystem services. Future landscapes will likely include an array of dedicated bioenergy crops and residues from conventional crops and forests as bioenergy feedstocks. Our research, as landscape ecologists, will guide the emerging bioeconomy toward spatial arrangements and decisions that support higher biodiversity and associated ecosystem services. The goal of this symposium is to reach a common understanding of how bioenergy landscapes can be designed to benefit wildlife and aquatic habitat. Because these questions feed into policy and processes that guide sustainable practices, we also invite research that uses spatial optimization, ecological valuation, and outreach to stakeholders to guide landscape management decisions.  

Conveners: Keith Kline, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Overview:

Access to energy affects human prosperity and well-being. Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, and a majority of anthropogenic climate forcing is associated with combustion of fossil fuels. More sustainable approaches to meeting long-term energy needs while conserving environmental, social and economic services, warrant serious consideration. Options include reducing use, increasing energy efficiency, and using renewable energy. This symposium focuses on case studies to highlight barriers and opportunities for renewable energy using biomass. Energy choices and sustainability assessment depend on the attributes of each specific context, which include existing infrastructure and capabilities; local social, economic, and environmental concerns and opportunities; extant policies; and investment options. Impacts on landscape patterns, composition and services depend on how deployment is implemented. Planning and implementation can be guided by systems designed to assess and inform decisions about biomass supply chain governance. Bioenergy has been used by humanity since the discovery of fire, and some of the most cost-effective investments to reduce human risks associated with natural disasters and climate change involve improving land management to increase productivity and long-term soil carbon sequestration. Performance monitoring to support continual improvement and adaptive management can help overcome barriers and focus efforts on local opportunities. Integrating bioenergy production across farms, forests and urban landscapes can help improve welfare today while supporting Sustainable Development Goals for a healthier world tomorrow. 

Conveners: Jianguo Liu, Michigan State University, Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability; Vanessa Hull, Michigan State University, Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability
Overview:

Landscapes around the world are increasingly telecoupled through flows of information, matter, energy, organisms, financial capital, and people. Such telecouplings (socioeconomic and ecological interactions over distances) have attracted attention worldwide because they have enormous impacts on landscape changes in the Anthropocene. For example, the Global Land Project has designated telecouplings as a priority in land system research and funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation have supported research projects on telecouplings. The new integrated telecoupling framework provides novel perspectives on how landscape changes in one location can have profound influences on landscapes far away. It treats each landscape as a coupled human and natural system, and a network of landscapes as telecoupled human and natural systems. It also offers a systematic lens to detect and understand hidden mechanisms behind landscape changes. The goal of this symposium is to highlight applications of the telecoupling framework to address important issues relevant to landscape changes, such as distant supply of and demand for ecosystem services and natural resources, conservation, migration, international trade, and sustainability across local to global scales. We hope that these presentations will stimulate more research on this rapidly developing frontier and provide useful information for more effective landscape management. 

Conveners: Stephen Matthews, Ohio State University, School of Environment and Natural Resources,; Louis Iverson, U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station
Overview:

Climate change is both impacting forests in many ways and being held in check to some degree by forest ecosystem services; in both aspects, informed forest management is key to sustaining resilient forests. However, the coarse temporal and spatial resolution of models of climate change presents challenges for long-range planning and coordinated management activities to facilitate adaptation and potential transition of these systems. In considering both the near and long-term likelihood of change, management plans that consider the potential biodiversity implications and importance of maintaining resilient forests are apparent. In this session we propose to bring together several perspectives to address how we can conceptualize and concatenate synergies to view forest management as a key agent of maintaining biodiversity in a time of pervasive environmental change. We propose to begin with a long-term view of how climate and drought have and can impact forest conditions and how forest management in this context can take advantage of known patterns and processes. Next, we will consider how understanding the potential responses to climate change can influence the adaptability of our forests when land managers are engaged. Further, as we consider the broader implications of climatic induced forest change, we will view these impacts not only in terms of potential direct changes but how resilient forests are vital to maintaining genetic diversity within species ranges and how forest change will likely impact the wildlife and broader biodiversity in coming decades.

Conveners: Audrey Mayer, Michigan Technological University; Emily Silver Huff, U.S. Forest Service
Overview:

Over 10.7 million family forest owners own an estimated 36% of America’s forestland, more than any other group. The decisions of these individuals, families, and trusts will affect the ecosystem services provided by forests. We observe these land use drivers, and their impacts on these landscapes, through remote sensing imagery, modelling, and regional to national-scale data collection efforts such as the U.S. Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis and the National Woodland Owner Survey. This session will include new research examining the dynamics of ownership in these family forest dominated landscapes, including socioeconomic changes in management behaviors, parcelization and development, and ownership characteristics. We will also examine the consequences of these dynamics on landscapes, including biophysical and ecological characteristics and invasive species. Finally, we will discuss policies directed at improved forest management and conservation on family forests.

Conveners: Jessica Mitchell, Appalachian State University, Department of Geography and Planning; Doug Newcomb, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Overview:

Small footprint Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) datasets are increasing in coverage, frequency and availability across the US. The technology has been widely adopted for ecological applications because it provides critical information about canopy height and shape characteristics across a landscape. This symposium opens with a look at advances in the use of LiDAR for ecological applications over the past decade. Talks focus on topics such as LiDAR techniques for wildlife habitat assessments, change detection, landscape metrics, biomass and LAI measurements, carbon inventories, invasion susceptibility and resilience, post-fire recovery, and restoration monitoring. Work that examines scaling behavior or incorporates data across platforms (terrestrial, airborne and satellite) is encouraged.  

Conveners: Paul Leonard, Clemson University; Robert Baldwin, Clemson University; Lars Pomara, U.S. Forest Service, Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center
Overview:

The recent proliferation of conservation plans at multiple "landscape" scales and by a variety of stakeholders is driving a need to better understand how the diversity of goals, methods, and outcomes relates to landscape level conservation decisions. Integrating sociocultural and biological conservation goals presents both opportunities and challenges, including the commensurability of qualitatively differing data types in synthetic planning frameworks. The over-riding necessity of incorporating climate change considerations in conservation designs is challenged by uncertainties associated with climate prediction at grains relevant to decision making. Land use change poses similar problems, as do interactions among multiple drivers of landscape change. Big data and ever-increasing computing power drive increases in analytical detail and scope which likely outpace both robust theoretical advances linking data to ecological process, and the growth of pragmatic linkages to decision-making. The symposium will critically consider the question "Where are we with decision-relevant, landscape-scale conservation planning?" In the spirit of "multiple competing hypotheses" and multiple-value frameworks, speakers will present and then discuss attributes of various methodologies for a variety of regions.  

Conveners: Harifidy Rakoto Ratsimba, University of Antananarivo (Madagascar), Department of Water and Forests, School of Agronomy, ESSA-Forêts
Overview:

Madagascar is known worldwide for its species and natural habitat endemism and its dramatically continuous deforestation which has significant impacts on local forest communities’ livelihoods. Current policies and initiatives have not yet found a balance between natural resource management, and local/national sustainable development. The Malagasy population is still extremely poor despite the country’s natural resource richness. Understanding landscape change and its impact on global environment and human wellbeing is crucial for the country as a tool for decision makers in prioritizing, leveraging, modeling, and implementing reforms. In fact, the country is now at a crossroads where many intensification opportunities have emerged in terms of mining, natural resource extractions (e.g., precious wood), energy needs, and agriculture, and where systems sustainability and human wellbeing have to be stressed and considered. This symposium is intended to have an overview of all best practices observed in the country in order to suggest more comprehensive solutions and recommendations based on landscape change monitoring and its impact assessment.

Conveners: Johanna Salzer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Micah Hahn, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
Overview:

Landscape plays a significant role as a barrier or a conduit of disease amplification and spread in human, domestic animal, and wildlife populations. Disease ecology is a rapidly evolving field focused on understanding how hosts, pathogens, vectors, and their environment evolve, respond, and interact with one another in ways that influence disease dynamics. Landscape can influence disease risk directly, for example through habitat availability for vector and zoonotic reservoir populations. Or alternatively, impacts may be more indirect by shifting the biodiversity of an ecosystem in ways that limit or propagate pathogen spread within the reservoir community. Ultimately, however, cultural, social, and political forces shape these human-environment interactions and understanding these human dimensions of landscape change is vital for limiting infectious disease spread. These presentations will highlight studies assessing the impact of land use change and human disturbance on the human-animal interface and risk of disease transmission. Talks will range from primate parasites in disturbed landscapes in Madagascar to the impact of proximity to parks in Atlanta on West Nile infections. We will ask each presenter to conclude their talk with a discussion on the implications of their disease ecology work for public health practice and potential interventions supported by their findings. This session will conclude with a panel discussion on the strengths and limitations of different methodological approaches for understanding landscape and infectious disease dynamics among humans, wildlife, and domestic animals. Additionally, we will use this time to discuss opportunities for collaboration between IALE and public health and disease ecology professional organizations and government agencies.  

Conveners: Mark Spangler, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Overview:

Amphibians are considered by many to be biotic indicators of the environment. Nowhere in the United States is this better exemplified than in Southern Appalachia, home to the highest diversity of salamanders in the world. As the landscape changes, amphibians are among the first to be impacted. From mountaintop removal and watershed destruction to climate change and agricultural runoff, this symposium highlights the innovative research methods that investigate how amphibians are responding to landscape change across the country. Symposium will conclude with an informal discussion of the subject and possible collaboration for a special topics journal paper/issue. 

Overview:

Landscape change is being caused by a variety of sources and stressors – from rapid urban growth to developing natural resources for their food and fiber, and increasingly from climate change. A primary approach to stem the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services that these changes portend is to maintain, mitigate, and restore landscape connectivity. Here we specifically frame connectivity in a more contemporary lens – moving away from discrete (and static) corridors to examining movement or connectivity across a more or less permeable landscape (i.e., gradient). The presenters will also emphasize practical issues that arise in the application and use of connectivity maps and models, and through placing their work within the relevant natural resource policies and land use planning context.

Conveners: Peter Vogt, European Commission, Joint Research Centre; Jennifer K. Costanza, North Carolina State University, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources
Overview:

The recent availability of more and higher resolution satellite data provides increased opportunities for long-term monitoring and assessment of landscape changes. New, advanced tools have been developed for the mapping and analyzing of different land cover aspects, such as landscape pattern, connectivity, forest degradation, fragmentation, heterogeneity, phenology, and multi-scale analysis. This symposium will focus on generic methodologies based on space-borne observations that can be relevant to a wide range of concerns. The generic nature of such analysis schemes provides a common framework that can be implemented for various thematic data types and at multiple measurement scales. It ensures the same inherent meaning across all biomes and up to global studies. Generic assessment schemes form a solid base for landscape planners and policy decision makers for the monitoring, evaluation, and statistical analysis of landscape changes. They can be used to evaluate ecological services of the changing landscape, which are vital to environmental and human health, including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, water and air purification, the maintenance of wildlife habitat, and the prevention of soil erosion and catastrophic wildfires. The symposium will conclude with a discussion on potentials and limitations, as well as synergies of generic analysis and multi-scale assessment schemes.

Conveners: Jelena Vukomanovic, University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Francesco Tonini, North Carolina State University, Center for Geospatial Analytics; Derek B. Van Berkel, North Carolina State University, Center for Geospatial Analytics; Ross K. Meentemeyer, North Carolina State University, Center for Geospatial Analytics
Overview:

Researchers and managers are increasingly recognizing the need for participatory research for actionable results. Management and policy decisions that involve active stakeholder engagement throughout the process are more likely to be seen as legitimate, are more likely to be accepted, and are therefore are more likely to succeed. Stakeholder engagement can help managers and policymakers to incorporate values and societal knowledge in plans, can assist in data collection for better science, and can result in the co-production of knowledge. A major challenge in this dialogue is communicating complex system dynamics that include non-linearity, feedbacks, and trade-offs. The sustainability of social-ecological systems requires strategies that consider both changes in different domains (ecological, socio-economic, and cultural) at different spatial and temporal scales, and their impacts. When there is no single definition of an environmental issue, when no definitive and optimal solution exists, and when proposed solutions create unintended secondary problems at different scales and domains, we see the emergence of wicked problems. With no optimal solutions, we must contend with trade-offs and thresholds and stakeholders are essential for defining and selecting acceptable options. Geospatial analytics, which allows for the spatially-explicit study and visualization of interactions across scales, offers tangible opportunities for participatory modeling. Here we discuss advances in participatory geospatial analytics, including modeling, scenario development, participatory projects, and photorealistic environments, to engage stakeholders and help address pressing environmental issues.  

Conveners: Liding Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences; Weiqi Zhou, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences; Steward Pickett, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
Overview:

More than half of the world population now resides in cities (or urban areas), and this proportion is projected to reach to 67.2% by 2050. Along with this unprecedented rate of population growth is the rapid and massive urban expansion around the world. This urban expansion has dramatically changed, and will continue to change the local/regional landscapes and even the global terrestrial surfaces, and in turn significantly alter ecological functions and processes with important consequences for ecosystem services. Understanding the process of urbanization and its associated landscape change, the driving forces, and how landscape change could affect ecosystem processes and services is crucial for sustainable urban planning and management. This symposium will offer a forum to exchange the latest research development focusing upon the changing urban landscapes and the socioeconomic drivers, and how these changes have affected and/or will affect ecosystem services and ultimately urban sustainability. Specifically, this symposium will focus on but is not limited to the following topics: 1) The spatio-temporal patterns of changing urban landscapes and the underlying driving forces; 2) The ecological and environmental consequences of urban landscape changes; 3) New theories, frameworks and methods in urban landscape change studies; and 4) Local and regional case studies on urban growth and landscape changes. The purposes of this session are 1) to bring together scholars to share their latest research; and 2) to facilitate developing an international community of researchers and practitioners for collaborative projects on urbanization and landscape change.