Art - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Kudzu - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Amphitheatre - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Bear - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Ghosts - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Cabin - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Art - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Art - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Martin - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Greenway - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Shortia - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Art - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Beverage - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Walnut Cove - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Fragmentation - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016
Buildings - Steve Norman, U.S. Forest Service - © 2016

Workshops

Check out the Full- and Half-Day Workshops being offered at the 2016 US-IALE Annual Meeting! Pre-registration and an additional fee will be required for participation.  Please check back for updates. 

Full-day

Instructor(s):
Falk Huettmann
Date and Time:
Sunday, April 3 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Fee:
$60
Description:

Participants will learn during this workshop how to obtain and to prepare GIS layers for SDMs (MAXENT, boosting, bagging and ensemble models), Marxan, ZONATION and similar applications. While this workshop will primarily deal with front-end modeling applications, and how to streamline and to batch (automatize) them for predictions and repeated runs, it will also deal with (repeated) posterior analysis of already obtained predictions and optimizations. Topics featured during this half-day workshop will be automated online data queries and downloads (GBIF and others, web-feature-services), presence-only data processing and GIS imports, environmental data downloads and raster preparations (e.g. Worldclim, IPCC, ETOPO1, World Ocean Atlas), socio-economic and road data, raster processing (e.g. NAs, clipping, projections, re-sampling, importing across formats, directory management), random point creation and prediction lattices, as well as several methods to do repeated overlays (“drill downs”) with many (!) GIS layers within a geographic projection. Landcover data sources, and the use and basic processing of Remote Sensing imagery will also be presented, as well as how to assemble socio-economic data layers. Techniques on how to carry out scenario runs and simulations will receive specific attention, dealing with processor memory considerations. Posterior modeling methods include computations of ROC, confusion matrices, Kappa and to summarize data from SDM and MARXAN runs for analytical publication purposes. Some basic layout and cartography topics of map predictions and underlying data sharing will be shown. The ultimate aim of this workshop is to enable participants worldwide for SDM and Strategic Conservation Planning models with OpenGIS tools so that they can deliver accurate and repeatable results quickly and to convince in their own subsequent SDM and MARXAN/ZONATION runs.

Intended Audience:
Anybody interested in Species Distribution Models and Strategic Conservation Planning
Instructor(s):
Jianguo (Jack) Liu and Vanessa Hull, Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University, USA
Date and Time:
Sunday, April 3 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Fee:
$60
Description:

Landscapes across the world are increasingly interconnected, both ecologically and socioeconomically. To understand and manage such complex interconnections, a new integrated framework of telecoupling is proposed (www.csis.msu.edu/telecoupling). Telecouplings are socioeconomic and ecological interactions between multiple coupled human and natural systems (e.g., landscapes) over distances. They occur during trade, water transfer, payment for ecosystem services, foreign investment, migration, and tourism. They also emerge when information flows, organisms disperse, species invade, and diseases spread. The award-winning framework of telecoupling emphasizes reciprocal cross-scale and cross-border interactions (e.g., feedbacks). Telecouplings have profound implications for landscape sustainability as they can transform landscape structure, function, pattern, process, and dynamics. They pose new global challenges and offer exciting new opportunities for the landscape ecology community. In this workshop, we will introduce the telecoupling framework, present applications of the framework, conduct hands-on exercises, and help workshop participants apply the framework to their issues of interest.

Intended Audience:
The target audience encompasses attendees at any career stage (e.g. student, postdoctoral scholar, professor, resource manager) and with a variety of interests, such as landscape change, climate change, natural resource policy and governance, biodiversity
Instructor(s):
Anna Petrasova, Vaclav Petras, Derek Van Berkel, Monica Dorning, Brian Pickard, Ross Meentemeyer, Helena Mitasova
Date and Time:
Sunday, April 3 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Fee:
$60
Description:

Spatial patterns of land use change due to urbanization and its impact on the landscape is the subject of ongoing research. Urban growth scenario simulation is a powerful tool for exploring these impacts and empowering planners to make informed decisions. In this workshop, we will introduce FUTURES (FUTure Urban - Regional Environment Simulation) - a patch-based, stochastic, multi-level land change modeling framework implemented in GRASS GIS 7. FUTURES is a fully open source land change modeling framework that accommodates multilevel drivers of land change across a heterogenous region.  Participants will learn the concepts, input data and general workflow of the model and get the chance to simulate emerging landscape spatial structure in urbanizing regions of North Carolina. We will start with hands-on exercises in GRASS GIS, a free and open source scientific platform for geoprocessing. We will cover spatial processing and analyses of urban growth predictors such as landscape topography, hydrography, cost and proximity, followed by introduction to spatio-temporal data handling and visualization. We will also demonstrate how GRASS GIS, Python and R interfaces can be leveraged for developing workflows, including tips and tricks for parallelization when working with ‘big data’. Participants will then run urban simulations using FUTURES with different possible population and spatial planning scenarios. This workshop is a great introduction to GRASS GIS including the unique tools available in GRASS GIS Addons repository.

Intended Audience:
Students, researchers, planners or policy-makers with interest in land change or in learning geoprocessing with GRASS GIS (no prior experience with GRASS GIS required).
Instructor(s):
Peter Vogt, European Commission, Joint Research Centre
Date and Time:
Sunday, April 3 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Fee:
$60
Description:

GuidosToolbox provides a variety of techniques for the description and analysis of digital image objects such as pattern, connectivity, fragmentation, naturalness, influence zones, distance, and post-classification change detection. It can also be used to generate input files for enhanced connectivity analysis in graph-theory applications, for example with the included software Conefor Sensinode. In addition, GuidosToolbox provides a variety of generic image analysis and processing tools, dedicated pre- and post-processing utilities, batch-processing routines for automated data processing, and map publishing in GoogleEarth. It is being used by a variety of organizations, for example the European Commission, the US-EPA, and the USDA Forest Service. Workshop outline: 1. Introduction and motivation for new ways of image analysis. 2. Morphological Spatial Pattern Analysis (MSPA): what it is and how it works. 3. GuidosToolbox: demonstration of program features, processing options, and sample applications. 4. Hands-on training using sample data sets: - Data preparation; - Pattern, network, naturalness, influence zones, and fragmentation analysis; - Import/export to ArcGIS/Quantum GIS, export to GoogleEarth overlays - Discussion, suggestions for new features/improvements, help with user-supplied data, etc.

Intended Audience:
Students/professionals, digital data analysts

Half-day

Instructor(s):
US-IALE Student Representatives: Rose Graves (ragraves@wisc.edu) and Whalen Dillon (wwdillon@ncsu.edu)
Date and Time:
Tuesday, April 5 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm
Fee:
$0
Description:

The focus of the US-IALE student workshop has shifted from general data visualization to understanding, visualizing, and selecting climate data. The workshop will be led by Ned Gardiner, a climate communication and data visualization expert for NOAA. An updated description follows:

The student workshop will focus on exploring how to use web tools and technologies in combination with best practices in science communication to help targeted audiences understand and use climate information. Participants will learn about visualization techniques, observational records of climate, and NOAAs extensive climate resources. Participants will practice accessing and analyzing selected climate data and understanding climate projections.

Intended Audience:
Students
Instructor(s):
Stuart H. Gage, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; Almo Farina, University of Urbino, Urbino, Italy, Anne Axel, Marshall University, Huntington, WV
Date and Time:
Tuesday, April 5 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm
Fee:
$30
Description:

The advent of automatic acoustic sensors has made the collection of large data sets possible and many ecologists are recording sounds in a multitude of landscapes. Landscape scale analysis of the soundscape is exciting but challenging. We will illustrate the use of analytical tools to analyze soundscape observations available in R statistical system, including a new software for the research of acoustic events. We will analyze three sets of acoustic recordings from: North America, Europe and Madagascar to demonstrate variety of soundscape by location. Two R packages (Seewave and Soundecology) specific to soundscape ecology will be used to analyze the recording sets. A new digital low-cost recorder with on-board processing of wav files using the Acoustic Complexity Index will be described in detail along with the post-processing software (Soundscape Meter 2.0®). After computing these indices, the workshop participants will be shown options for visualization of the index data for the three data sets to enable comparison between locations and each index. Workshop participants will understand how to utilize R to compute and visualize sound data and will be provided the scripts, sample data sets, as well as a copy of the software, Soundscape Meter.

Intended Audience:
students/professionals interested in ecoacoustics